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in what era the matter and antimatter existed

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in what era the matter and antimatter existed, In the early universe, there was probably an equal amount of matter and antimatter. This phase is called the GUT era. In this epoch, atoms were made up of protons, neutrons and electrons, and each of these particles had a counterpart, an antiparticle. There were just as many matter particles as antimatter particles in the universe, and they only existed in unstable mixture of matter and antimatter.

Remnant of this turbulent epoch was a tiny imbalance between matter and antimatter – the basis for the later birth of everything we see in the universe today.

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<h2>in what era the matter and antimatter existed</h2>
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in what era the matter and antimatter existed

It is believed that in the early stages of the universe, there was almost an equal amount of matter and antimatter. This phase is called the GUT era. During this time, quarks didn't exist as free matter, but anti-matter was present. The Big Bang created an imbalance between matter and antimatter, with matter winning out in the end. After the Big Bang, space was formed and matter was generated. Our universe already existed before the Big Bang, but it was in a different form.

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During the Big Bang

During the Big Bang

It is widely believed that matter and antimatter were created in equal amounts during the Big Bang. So what happened to all the antimatter? It's a question that has puzzled scientists for years.

One theory is that there was a tiny imbalance between matter and antimatter in the early stages of the universe, and that's what led to the creation of our world as we know it today.

When matter and antimatter collide, they annihilate each other and turn into energy. So most of the matter that was created in the Big Bang would have been destroyed when it collided with antimatter.

But some matter must have survived, and that's what makes up our world today. All the atoms in your body, for example, are made of matter.

Post Big Bang

Post Big Bang

It is believed that in the earliest stages of the cosmos, there was almost an equal amount of matter and antimatter. This is phase is called the GUT era. In this epoch, the universe was incredibly hot, and particles were constantly colliding and annihilating each other. However, a tiny imbalance between matter and antimatter was necessary for the “electroweak” phase transition in the early stages of the universe. After a few seconds, the temperature of matter, antimatter and light was up to 10 billion degrees Kelvin. The big bang is not an explosion that occurs sometime in the past. Instead, it is the moment when time and space began.

Early Universe

Early Universe

Why did almost all of the antimatter in the universe disappear? And could it possibly be detected?

Antimatter is matter made up of antiparticles. Anti-atoms have atomic shells made of positrons and atomic nuclei made of antiprotons.

It is believed that there was a tiny imbalance between matter and antimatter in the early universe – the basis for the later birth of galaxies.

The universe, as we see it today with its galaxies, stars and planets, shouldn't actually exist according to some theories.

For example, they predict that in the early days of the universe, matter and antimatter will start annihilating each other shortly thereafter.

However, it is assumed that there were decays of particles in the early universe that led to a slight excess of matter over antimatter. This allowed for the later formation of galaxies.

Middle Universe

Middle Universe

It is believed that in the early universe, matter and antimatter existed in equal amounts. This period is known as the GUT era, and it is thought that during this time, matter and antimatter annihilated each other, leaving behind a tiny amount of matter that went on to form the universe as we know it today. Researchers are still trying to determine why there was this imbalance between matter and antimatter in the early universe, and what happened to all of the antimatter that should have been created.

Late Universe

Late Universe

It is believed that matter and antimatter existed in equal amounts in the early universe, a time period known as the GUT era. Matter is made up of protons, neutrons and electrons, while antimatter is made up of antiparticles. Currently, only matter is seen in the cosmos. It is not known what happened to all the antimatter.

Matter Domination Era

Matter Domination Era

The era of matter domination was a time when there was almost equal amounts of matter and antimatter in the universe. This phase is called the GUT era, and it is believed that during this time a slight matter-antimatter asymmetry occurred. This asymmetry is what led to the creation of our universe as we know it today.

Dark Ages

Dark Ages

The search for antimatter is ongoing, as its existence could explain why our universe is made up of matter. In the early stages of the cosmos, there was probably an equal amount of matter and antimatter. However, our current universe is made up almost entirely of matter. This has led scientists to believe that there must be some sort of asymmetry between matter and antimatter in order for our universe to exist.

Stelliferous Era

Stelliferous Era

It is believed that in the early universe, matter and antimatter existed in equal parts. This stage is called the GUT era. In this epoch, particles and their antiparticles were created in equal amounts. However, for some reason there was a slight excess of matter over antimatter. This imbalance is thought to be what led to the formation of our present-day universe of matter.

Degenerate Era

Degenerate Era

The universe is made up of matter and antimatter, which are particles that have the opposite charge of regular particles. In the early stages of the universe's development, there was probably an equal amount of matter and antimatter. However, for some reason that is not fully understood, there was a slightmatter-antimatter asymmetry: to each matter particle there was an antimatter particle, but there were slightly more matter particles than antimatter particles. This imbalance is what led to the formation of the universe as we know it today.